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NickEast

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NickEast last won the day on October 9

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  1. The original team is dead, there is nothing that says the new team has to have the exact same specialty. In my setting, SG-7 has just been newly assembled as a secondary to SG-1 (that is, a multi-focus team), hence why they are sent on the missions that my story centers around. That was also the point of me picking that team designation, as it was never seen nor heard from again throughout the rest of the series, so it contradicts nothing (though my plot may be very slightly contradictory)
  2. The thing is, is this meant to be a "Stargate: Phoenix" RPG, a spinoff of the series, or an actual "Stargate" RPG? That should clarify things. Because usually when a TTRPG is developed based on an IP, it is meant to allow players to play within that IP's universe, with little restrictions other than what can fit in the books. The core rulebook usually explains the rules and provides character and adventure creation rules for the core elements of the series. Star Trek Adventures allows you to create Starfleet characters and ships to create stories like the shows, with supplements adding rules for other species. Star Wars allows you to play as Jedi, Sith, smugglers, soldiers, bounty hunters, etc. Everything you're used to in the shows/movies. The original Stargate RPG did the same, providing a breakdown of the story as it existed back then, describing the SGC, Goa'uld Empire, etc. Then it provided rules for all major species, Tau'ri, Jaffa, Tok'ra, Asgard, etc. It didn't restrict the kind of stories you could tell. It also provided character sheets based on all major characters, with supplements adding more NPCs based on each season that existed at that point. Based on what I read about "Phoenix", it's not something I'd be interested in. I want to create SG/AR teams, as cliche as that sounds but I imagine a lot of fans would want that too. I already have my own story that I wanted to write fan-fiction for, which is centered around SG-7 (since that team was neither seen nor heard from again after the original team was killed by Nirrti in "Singularity"), and it's also set during season 6. As SG teams, and Stargate Command, are such important aspects of the Stargate universe, I would think that and other canon material would have a higher priority than non-canon material designed just for the RPG. For example, Star Trek Adventures has a Living Campaign with a series of episodic stories taking place party in the TOS era and mainly in 2171 (S3/4 of DS9), based around four pre-designed starships and is set in a region of space designed specifically for the game. Yet the rules are not restricted just to those stories, everyone can still create any other kind of Star Trek story, even including canon material like the Enterprise or DS9 and their crew, set in any of the main eras.
  3. According to the interview, all playable species will be alien and not Tau'ri. Why have you chosen this exactly? Because I find that kind of limiting, especially considering the Stargate franchise is about us Earthlings getting out there. Having variation by being able to play as different alien species is of course very good, but why remove the most important human race from the franchise? Granted, if you can play as a non-Earth human and if there are rules for Earth equipment like weapons and gadgets, then there shouldn't be a problem to create Tau'ri characters, but it still seems very odd for a Stargate game. That's almost like saying you can't play a human in Star Wars or as Starfleet in Star Trek.
  4. D&D supports multiclassing. The original Spycraft-based Stargate RPG from Alderac used that to represent Carter.
  5. The Zat was pretty consistent throughout the show. They eventually just dropped the "third shot disintegrates" feature because they felt it was too cheesy and/or OP. But it has been used very frequently to kill, it's just that it wasn't ever necessary to actually show that the people shot by it were actually dead, the story just moved on. Later in the show, most action shots happen very quickly, but you can hear Zats firing twice in rapid succession on many occasions. I always imagined that Zats work like tasers. When shot, they, at the very least, electrocute the target, which could have a stun effect and obviously be quite painful. When shot they leave a kind of residual energy (marked by the electrical discharge you see when someone or something is shot). That energy dissipates over a relatively short period of time. As long as that residual energy is present, a second shot could "overload" the target's nervous system and brain, and kill them instantly. With the "third shot" it could potentially be that the energy discharges so that the target's molecules, or rather atoms, are pulled apart, which disintegrates the target completely (like a Star Trek phaser at full power). If too much time passes, the energy dissipates and a shot would just "tase" the target again.
  6. Welcome! While not done for RPGs, I did once made a 3D Stargate simply by printing it out on paper, cutting it out and gluing layers together, using what is known as "3D foam pads", a kind of foam with adhesive on both sides, to add thickness. Then I just used LEGO to build the ramp and put it upright. It's very cheap, but still looks pretty good. I also included an iris and the event horizon that I could fit inside easily enough.
  7. Here's one thing I think we all would want: Furlings... am I right? Come to think of it, that gives me a cool campaign idea anyway... scuttles away to start writing...
  8. AFAIK, 5e is very different from its predecessors. This version of a Stargate RPG simply cannot be a d20 Modern clone, because d20 Modern is based on 3e. In vanilla 5e, every character has the same fixed list of skills. The skill level depends on the abilities, which in turn can have racial (species) bonuses. Classes determine which skills someone is "proficient" in, which adds an additional bonus.
  9. I've made my server somewhat ready. Though I'm a little apprehensive to just put the invite here, depending on what the rules are. Maybe an Admin can give their blessing, just to be on the safe side. EDIT: Well, as long as it's not going to cause a problem, here's the invite: https://discord.gg/GdnWurv Feel free to join me, but obviously there isn't much to do yet without having the rules. I'm at present working on Star Trek Adventures at the moment, implementing it in a VTT. But there's room for discussing Stargate, Star Trek, or RPGs in general.
  10. Perhaps a Strength save rather than Dex, because the sheer force of the impact would knock someone down, so having a stronger footing (like a Jaffa) would allow them to remain standing. Standard kevlar is not worse than no armor, but it doesn't help much either. And later on, it is assumed that standard kevlar was replaced with a new type of material that does protect against a staff weapon's damage (but as demonstrated by Sgt. Siler, the blast still knocks you across the room). Armor degrading does happen IRL, but I believe it could add more complexity to tracking armor and health if not handled well. Perhaps a kind of "resistance" against damage (e.g. amount reduced from total damage) that decreases with certain hits, until 0 or a base AC bonus or something. But that's beyond the scope of the topic on staff weapons. I think weapons and armor should be balanced between screen accuracy and game balance. I agree that both staffs and zats are rather difficult to balance for a game, due to how different they can work between scenes/episodes, and how OP they can be.
  11. Based on what I know from D&D 5e, I think staff weapons should have a relatively short-medium effective range, with penalties beyond that (don't know if disadvantage is enough though, but maybe it is). A hit should definitely cause a knockdown, damage depends on how weapons overall do damage and how it can be mitigated with armor and dodging. As a melee weapon it has also proven to be effective, so in close range/within reach it should be usable as such. In either case, it's obviously a two-handed weapon. I think there's a good balance between being inaccurate and causing a lot of damage, and the ability to dodge at medium to long range.
  12. I'm not sure if people already are in Discord servers, or if they are at all interested, but I have a proposition: Some time ago I got together with a few people in a Discord server about creating a world collaboratively and create RPG adventures for us to play in that world. Not much has come from that (yet), but based on recent developments there may still be use for the server as a whole. So now I had the idea of reorganizing the server for games I'd like to play, and anyone interested in joining me. This includes Stargate, Star Trek, and perhaps D&D 5e (in addition to the collaborative world). So my question to everyone here, especially those that are new to RPGs or still just an early beginner, if you're interested in joining me, feel free to ask. Right now I'm only gauging interest from here and on GateWorld to try and get more Stargate (and perhaps Star Trek) fans together.
  13. Technically, if this is based on 5e, not much would, or could, be taken from other non-5e games, as then it wouldn't be a 5e game anymore (with the exception of mechanics that don't exist in 5e but are necessary for Stargate). Especially if it changes the core mechanics of rolling a d20, and the abilities/skills. That said, I do think perhaps straight up using 5e is maybe not the right way for recreating the feeling of Stargate. I've grown rather fond of the 2d20 system used for Star Trek Adventures, though it has no OGL so that's out. But other than a feeling I have very little actual experience to think what would work best for things like zats. Usually I'm a stickler for canon, so by default I'd stick with the in-universe mechanics of such weapons/technology, but I can see that it won't always fit well for a game mechanic.
  14. The way Star Trek Adventures did it is exactly what I think fits perfectly for Stargate. Each expansion book has a very specific topic it fleshes out, so players know exactly what they need in addition to the core book. The game as a whole, specifically flavor text and examples, focus on roughly the "halfway point" in the franchise, right before the Dominion War breaks out in DS9. So this is after DS9 and Voyager expanded upon the "Next Generation era" as established by TNG, but before the bigger changes as a result of the war. In the context of Stargate, that's exactly why I felt that the "context" of the core book should be near the end, or just after, SG-1, or perhaps even around S7 before SGA and SGU. This would keep the universe "simple" for the core rule book. As for expansions you could have: Destiny (about SGU) Atlantis (about SGA) Ancients/Goa'uld/Asgard/Wraith/Ori (perhaps smaller books explaining the bigger species in detail and about how to play them in different eras) Space (talking about spacecraft and space combat) Galaxies (expanding upon minor species and organizations in the various galaxies, like the Lucian Alliance and Genii, could be split between Milky Way and Pegasus books, and a more generic one for the rest, like the Alpha/Beta/Delta/Gamma Quadrant STA books) Something like that.
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